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Jack Crooks: A self-feeding loop of confusion...


Posted by Jack Crooks - Black Swan Capital

on Wednesday, 08 February 2012 08:23

I think by most conventional measures, used by most professional investors, European Central Bank Chief Mario Draghi has been a success. He has bolstered the returns for equity funds considerably since his decision to utilize a three-year term, instead of one year, in the ECB recent liquidity injection to European banks.
 
The fact is I missed the trees for the forest on this, and it has hurt. Failing to understand this lending-which reduced stigma associated with 1-year terms and better matched the funding needs of banks, led to more participation than expected. This in turn created a classic self-reinforcing positive feedback loop for asset prices:



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Gold & Precious Metals

Peter Schiff: The Main Driver Behind the Gold Bull


Posted by Peter Schiff & James Rickards

on Wednesday, 08 February 2012 07:19

Screen shot 2012-02-08 at 6.30.34 AM

 

A Wall Street pro named James Rickards recently released his first book,Currency Wars: The Making of the Next Global Crisis, and it's creating a buzz. Euro Pacific Precious Metals' CEO Peter Schiff often talks about competitive devaluation of currencies as the main driver behind our gold and silver investments. Recently, Peter sat down with James to get his perspective on what's behind these currency wars, and find out what he recommends investors do to preserve their wealth through this tumultuous time.

-----

Peter Schiff: You portray recent monetary history as a series of currency wars - the first being 1921-1936, the second being 1967-1987, and the third going on right now. This seems accurate to me. In fact, my father got involved in economics because he saw the fallout of what you would call Currency War II, back in the '60s. What differentiates each of these wars, and what is most significant about the current one?



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Stocks & Equities

The Best Growing Energy Stocks With Highest Dividend Yield


Posted by Dividend Yield

on Wednesday, 08 February 2012 01:14

Energy is of huge importance for the growth of the economy. The demand is steadily growing and the political change away from nuclear power to renewable energy slows the supply growth of energy. I screened stocks from the investment theme by the best growth over the past 10 years. I decided to select only stocks with a double-digit sales growth and a dividend yield of more than three percent. Fourteen stocks fulfilled my criteria. The highest growth was realized by Penn Virginia Resource Partners (PVR) who had a yearly growth of 40.3 percent. One company has a yield of more than 50 percent.

Here are my favorite stocks:

BPL

1. Buckeye Partners (BPL) has a market capitalization of $5.89 billion. The company employs 859 people, generates revenues of $3,151.27 million and has a net income of $43.08 million. The firm’s earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) amounts to $338.70 million. Because of these figures, the EBITDA margin is 10.75 percent (operating margin 8.87 percent and the net profit margin finally 1.37 percent). 

 

The total debt representing 50.51 percent of the company’s assets and the total debt in relation to the equity amounts to 129.65 percent. Due to the financial situation, a return on equity of 5.27 percent was realized. Twelve trailing months earnings per share reached a value of $0.80. Last fiscal year, the company paid $3.82 in form of dividends to shareholders.

 

Here are the price ratios of the company: The P/E ratio is 79.04, Price/Sales 1.88 and Price/Book ratio 3.26. Dividend Yield: 6.44 percent. The beta ratio is 0.26. 


HEP


2. Holly Energy Partners (HEP) has a market capitalization of $1.22 billion. The company employs 148 people, generates revenues of $182.10 million and has a net income of $58.87 million. The firm’s earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) amounts to $121.35 million. Because of these figures, the EBITDA margin is 66.64 percent (operating margin 49.84 percent and the net profit margin finally 32.33 percent). 

 

The total debt representing 76.43 percent of the company’s assets and the total debt in relation to the equity amounts to 449.52 percent. Due to the financial situation, a return on equity of 17.33 percent was realized. Twelve trailing months earnings per share reached a value of $2.47. Last fiscal year, the company paid $3.32 in form of dividends to shareholders.

 

Here are the price ratios of the company: The P/E ratio is 22.39, Price/Sales 8.30 and Price/Book ratio 4.86. Dividend Yield: 6.41 percent. The beta ratio is 0.65. 


PAA


3. Plains All American Pipelines (PAA) has a market capitalization of $11.65 billion. The company employs 3,500 people, generates revenues of $25,893.00 million and has a net income of $514.00 million. The firm’s earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) amounts to $1,016.00 million. Because of these figures, the EBITDA margin is 3.92 percent (operating margin 2.96 percent and the net profit margin finally 1.99 percent). 

 

The total debt representing 43.47 percent of the company’s assets and the total debt in relation to the equity amounts to 137.19 percent. Due to the financial situation, a return on equity of 8.01 percent was realized. Twelve trailing months earnings per share reached a value of $4.18. Last fiscal year, the company paid $3.76 in form of dividends to shareholders.

 

Here are the price ratios of the company: The P/E ratio is 18.64, Price/Sales 0.47 and Price/Book ratio 2.60. Dividend Yield: 5.25 percent. The beta ratio is 0.50. 

 

Take a closer look at the full table of energy stocks with fastest growth and big dividends. The average price to earnings ratio (P/E ratio) amounts to 20.95. The dividend yield has a value of 9.02 percent. Price to book ratio is 2.70 and price to sales ratio 2.88. The operating margin amounts to 26.35 percent.


Related stock ticker symbols:
ARLP, BPT, BPL, HEP, MMP, MMLP, PGH, PVR, PTR, PBR, PAA, RES, TGS, YZC



Timing & trends

The Fed Resumes Printing


Posted by Bud Conrad, Casey Research

on Wednesday, 08 February 2012 00:00

 

AllCentralBanksArePrinting 0

The Federal Reserve recently announced important policy changes after its Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting. Here are the three most important takeaways, in its own words:

 

1.The Committee decided today to keep the target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1/4 percent and currently anticipates that economic conditions – including low rates of resource utilization and a subdued outlook for inflation over the medium run – are likely to warrant exceptionally low levels for the federal funds rate at least through late 2014.

 

2.The Committee judges that inflation at the rate of 2 percent, as measured by the annual change in the price index for personal consumption expenditures, is most consistent over the longer run with the Federal Reserve's statutory mandate. In the most recent projections, FOMC participants' estimates of the longer-run normal rate of unemployment had a central tendency of 5.2 percent to 6.0 percent.

 

3.The Fed released FOMC participants' target federal funds rate for the next few years.



Immediate Reactions

Bonds & Interest Rates

The 2008 Financial Crisis Was Nothing Compared To What Lies Ahead


Posted by Michael Snyder

on Tuesday, 07 February 2012 09:31

The people out there that believe that the U.S. economy is experiencing a permanent recovery and that very bright days are ahead for us should have their heads examined.  Unfortunately, what we are going through right now is simply just a period of “hopetimism” between two financial crashes.  Things may seem relatively stable right now, but it won’t last long.  The truth is that the financial crisis of 2008 was just a warm up act for the economic horror show that is coming.  Nothing really got fixed after the crash of 2008.  We are living in the biggest debt bubble in the history of the world, and it has gotten even bigger since then.  The “too big to fail” banks are larger now than they have ever been.  Americans continue to run up credit card balances like there is no tomorrow.  Tens of thousands of manufacturing facilities and millions of jobs continue to leave the country.  We continue to consume far more than we produce and we continue to become poorer as a nation.  None of the problems that caused the crisis of 2008 have been solved and we are even weaker financially than we were back then.  So why in the world are so many people so optimistic about the economy right now? The Next Next Financial Crisis Will Be Devastating To The Economy

 

Just take a look at the chart posted below.  It shows the growth of total debt in the United States.  During the financial crisis of 2008 there was a little “hiccup”, but the truth is that not much deleveraging really took place at all.  And since the recession “ended”, total credit market debt has gone on to even greater heights….

Total-Credit-Market-Debt-Owed-440x264



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