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Timing & trends

1987 Stock Market Crash Anniversary Predictions; Rubbish as usual

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Posted by Sol Palha - Tactical Investor

on Tuesday, 24 October 2017 06:30

Stubbornness does have its helpful features. You always know what you're going to be thinking tomorrow.

Glen Beaman

Expert after expert is busy proclaiming that the world is about to come to grinding halt again. They never seem to let up on pushing this sewage onto the unsuspecting masses. This is a clear example of insanity in action; mouthing the same nonsense over and over again with the desperate hope that this time the outcome will be different.  The outcome will not be different this time, at least not yet. These guys should focus on writing fiction for reality seems to elude them completely. For years we have stated (and rightly so) that until the sentiment changes, this market will continue to soar higher and higher. 

 Here is a small sample of the flood of articles that were pushed out this month. If one simply glances through them, one would almost be compelled to think that the writers shared the same notes.  There is almost no originality in these articles. The theme is the same, just because it’s October the focus is on the disaster aspect of the 1987 crash. Almost no one mentions that it proved to be a monumental buying opportunity. The focus is oh the financial world came to a grinding halt. Only it did not, the only that came to a halt was the rubbish the predecessors of today’s experts were uttering back in 1987.  This reinforces the view that most financial writers have chosen the wrong profession   One word sums all this nonsense “Rubbish.” 

Could the 1987 stock market crash happen again? - Reuters

Black Monday anniversary: How the 2017 stock market compares with 1987 - Market Watch 

Black Monday: 30 years after 1987 stock market crash... Wall Street raises fears of REPEAT- express.co.uk

Thursday marks 30th anniversary of the Black Monday stock market crash - courier-journal

Buy Climax at 30th Anniversary of 1987 Stock Market Crash – Money Show 

The Crash of ’87, From the Wall Street Players Who Lived It - Bloomberg 

Black Monday: Can a 1987-style stock market crash happen again? - USA Today

So are we stating that the stock market will never crash?

No that is not what we are stating.  The market will crash, but for the astute investor, “crash” is the wrong word to use. A strong correction is more likely as most astute investors got into this market a long time ago. It is the crowd that will eventually decide to embrace close to the top that will experience this crash that the experts have been hyping about for years. 

This market will experience one strong correction before it crashes, but the moment the Dow sheds 1000 points or more these experts will crawl from the rocks they were hiding under and start screaming bloody murder. To which our response is, please scream as loud as you can; for it will push the markets lower creating a better buying opportunity for us.  This is exactly what we said in Aug of 2015 before Trump won and countless times before and after that.  

This market is extremely overbought so a pullback ranging from 1500-3000 points should surprise no one and it certainly should not be construed as a crash but viewed as market releasing a well-deserved dose of steam. To state otherwise, would simply be disingenuous, which seems to be the only real qualification these so-called experts posses 

Market Sentiment indicates that the crowd is far from Ecstatic 

Anxiety index Oct 2017



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Timing & trends

Greg Weldon: Debt-Driven Consumer Economy Breaking Down

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Posted by Mik Gleason - MoneyMetals.com

on Monday, 23 October 2017 06:42

youtube-thumbnail-gregweldon

Listen to the Podcast Audio: Click Here

Mike Gleason: It is my privilege now to welcome in Greg Weldon, CEO and President of Weldon Financial. Greg has over three decades of market research and trading experience, specializing in metals and commodity markets and even authored a book in 2006 titled Gold Trading Bootcamp, where he accurately predicted the implosion of the U.S. credit market and urged people to buy gold when it was only $550 an ounce.

He is a highly sought-after presenter at financial conferences throughout the country, and is a regular guest on financial shows throughout the world, and it's good to have him back here on the Money Metals Podcast.

Greg, thanks for joining us today. And it's nice to talk to you again. How are you?

Greg Weldon: I'm great, thanks. My pleasure, Micheal.

Mike Gleason: Well, when we had you on back in mid-August you were optimistic about gold at the time. We had a pretty good move higher, shortly thereafter that ended up with gold hitting a one year high. But it stalled out around $1,350 in early September and we're currently back below $1,300 as we're talking here on Wednesday afternoon. Gold hit resistance at about the same level in the summer of last year, so give us your update as to your current outlook. What drivers, if any, do you see that can push gold through that $1,350 resistance level in the months ahead, Greg?

Greg Weldon: Yeah, well, exactly as you said. You had the move that we were anticipating when we last spoke and it kind of had already started from the 1205-ish level. All of this fitting into the kind of bigger picture, technical structure that still leads to a bullish resolution. But as you accurately mentioned, you got up to what have been close to, not quite even towards last summer's highs around $1,375, $1,377. In this case, around $1,360 and ran out of steam.

The dollar kind of changed some of the picture and the thought process linked to the Fed changed some of the picture. So, you embarked on a downside correction. $1,260 was the low, you have a nice little correction from that level. That was the level that equated to 200-day exponential moving average. It's a level that was just below the 38% Fibonnaci retracement of the move up from $1,205. Actually, the move up from $1,123 back at the end of 2016. So you had real, critical support there. So, to me, everything's kind of mapped out the way you might expect it to, structurally, in this market.



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Timing & trends

The 3 Most Popular Articles Of The Week

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Posted by Money Talks Editor

on Saturday, 21 October 2017 07:24

hammock-on-beach1. How Much Money Do You Need To Retire On Dividends Alone?

For the past 18-years Ryan Irvine has had a remarkable track record with average returns well over 30% annually over the last 4 years. Ryan tells Michael and the Money Talks audience today about the cash generating and under followed small-cap stocks that he has found. Between 1926 - 2004 Small-cap stocks averaged a 15.9% return compared to only 9.26% for Large Caps and thats the reason Warren Buffet laments he has grown to large to buy them.

...read more HERE

2. Victor Adair: This Tremendous Rally in Share Prices

This tremendous rally in share prices has been fueled by a $15 Trillion tsunami of Quantitative Easing from the Big Four central banks (and who knows how much “accommodation” from the People’s Bank of China) and even though the Fed has announced a very modest program of “Quantitative Tightening” the ECB and the BoJ will continue with their “stimulative” programs.

....continue HERE

3. Warning: 43% of Giant Eurozone Banks in Danger

by Martin D. Weiss PH.D

"This hard data confirms our view that, among the economic superpowers, the United States continues to win the Miss Universe crown for the “least ugly.”

....read it all HERE



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Timing & trends

Calm Before The Storm

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Posted by Peter Schiff - Euro Pacific Capital

on Friday, 20 October 2017 07:35

In light of the 30-year anniversary of the Black Monday Crash in 1987 (when the Dow lost more than 20% in "one day", we should be reminded that investor anxiety usually increases when markets get to extremes. If stock prices fall steeply, people fret about money lost, and if they move too high too fast, they worry about sudden reversals. As greed is supposed to be counterbalanced by fear, this relationship should not be surprising. But sometimes the formula breaks down and stocks become very expensive even while investors become increasingly complacent. History has shown that such periods of untethered optimism have often presaged major market corrections. Current data suggests that we are in such a period, and in the words of our current President, we may be "in the calm before the storm."

Many market analysts consider the Cyclically Adjusted Price to Earnings (CAPE) ratio to be the best measure of stock valuation. Also known as the “Shiller Ratio” (after Yale professor Robert Shiller), the number is derived by dividing the current price of a stock by its average inflation-adjusted earnings over the last 10 years. Since 1990, the CAPE ratio of the S&P 500 has averaged 25.6. The ratio got particularly bubbly, 44.2, during the 1999 crescendo of the “earnings don’t matter” dotcom era of the late 1990’s. But after the tech crash of 2000, the ratio was cut in half, drifting down to 21.3 by March of 2003. For the next five years, the CAPE hung around historic averages before collapsing to 13.3 in the market crash of 2008-2009. Since then, the ratio has moved steadily upward, returning to the upper 20s by 2015. But in July of this year, the CAPE breached 30 for the first time since March 2002. It has been there ever since (which is high when compared to most developed markets around the world). (data from Irrational Exuberance, Princeton University Press 2000, 2005, 2015, updated Robert J. Shiller)

But unlike earlier periods of stock market gains, the extraordinary run-up in CAPE over the past eight years has not been built on top of strong economic growth. The gains of 1996-1999 came when quarterly GDP growth averaged 4.6%, and the gains of 2003-2007 came when quarterly GDP averaged 2.96%. In contrast Between 2010 and 2017, GDP growth had averaged only 2.1% (data from Bureau of Economic Analysis). It is clear to some that the Fed has substituted itself for growth as the primary driver for stocks.

Investors typically measure market anxiety by looking at the VIX index, also known as “the fear index”. This data point, calculated by the Chicago Board Options Exchange, looks at the amount of put vs. call contracts to determine sentiment about how much the markets may fluctuate over the coming 30 days. A number greater than 30 indicates high anxiety while a number less than 20 suggests that investors see little reason to lose sleep.

Since 1990, the VIX has averaged 19.5 and has generally tended to move up and down with CAPE valuations. Spikes to the upside also tended to occur during periods of economic uncertainty like recessions. (The economic crisis of 2008 sent the VIX into orbit, hitting an all-time high of 59.9 in October 2008.) However, the Federal Reserve’s Quantitative Easing bond-buying program, which came online in March of 2009, may have short-circuited this fundamental relationship.

Before the crisis, there was still a strong belief that stock investing entailed real risk. The period of stock stagnation of the 1970s and 1980s was still well remembered, as were the crashes of 1987, 2000, and 2008. But the existence of the Greenspan/Bernanke/Yellen “Put” (the idea that the Fed would back stop market losses), came to ease many of the anxieties on Wall Street. Over the past few years, the Fed has consistently demonstrated that it is willing to use its new tool kit in extraordinary ways.

While many economists had expected the Fed to roll back its QE purchases as soon as the immediate economic crisis had passed, the program steamed at full speed through 2015, long past the point where the economy had apparently recovered. Time and again, the Fed cited fragile financial conditions as the reason it persisted, even while unemployment dropped and the stock market soared.

The Fed further showcased its maternal instinct in early 2016 when a surprise 8% drop in stocks in the first two weeks of January (the worst ever start of a calendar year on Wall Street) led it to abandon its carefully laid groundwork for multiple rate hikes in 2016. As investors seem to have interpreted this as the Fed leaving the safety net firmly in place, the VIX has dropped steadily from that time. In September of this year, the VIX fell below 10.

Untethered optimism can be seen most clearly by looking at the relationship between the VIX and the CAPE ratio. Over the past 27 years, this figure has averaged 1.43. But just this month, the ratio approached 3 for the first time on record, increasing 100% in just a year and a half. This means that the gap between how expensive stocks have become and how little this increase concerns investors has never been wider. But history has shown that bad things can happen after periods in which fear takes a back seat.

VIXCAPE5



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Timing & trends

A 2-3% Correction Could Wipe Out Most VIX Short Sellers

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Posted by John Maulding via Seeking Alpha

on Friday, 20 October 2017 06:55

Summary

- Did you know that there have been 39 times since 1990 when the VIX has closed below 10, and that 30 of those times have happened this year?

- And 15 of those have been in the last 30 days!

- A 2% or 3% move down in the markets could cause short covering in the VIX that could quickly spiral out of control.

Did you know that there have been 39 times since 1990 when the VIX has closed below 10, and that 30 of those times have happened this year? And 15 of those have been in the last 30 days!

Ed Easterling of Crestmont Research sent me recently an updated chart of the VIX Index. Notice that the all-time low of 9.19 was put in on October 5, 2017.

saupload 171016 OP Correction image1

.....continue reading HERE

....also from Seeking Alpha:

Ray Dalio's Shorting The Entire EU



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