Login

Personal Finance

Demographic Trends for the 50-and-Older Work Force

Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter

Posted by Jill Mislinski - Advisor Perspectives

on Friday, 09 June 2017 06:55

Note: This commentary has been updated with the latest numbers from last week's Employment Report.


Our earlier update on demographic trends in employment included a chart illustrating the growth (or shrinkage) in six age cohorts since the turn of the century. In this commentary, we'll zoom in on the age 50 and older Labor Force Participation Rate (LFPR).

But first, let's review the big picture. The overall LFPR is a simple computation: You take the Civilian Labor Force (people age 16 and over employed or seeking employment) and divide it by the Civilian Noninstitutional Population (those 16 and over not in the military and or committed to an institution). The result is the participation rate expressed as a percent.

For the larger context, here is a snapshot of the monthly LFPR for age 16 and over stretching back to the Bureau of Labor Statistics' starting point in 1948, the blue line in the chart below, along with the unemployment rate.

cb4ccd703501bc5c3ce5325b9a967c0d

 

....continue reading HERE

 



Banner

Personal Finance

Can You Afford to Reach 100?

Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter

Posted by John Mauldin - Mauldin Economicsin - Mauldin Economics

on Monday, 05 June 2017 06:15

"This week I have good news and bad news for you" - John Mauldin

Centenarians Everywhere
The $400 Trillion Gap
A Wedding and the Virgin Islands

“I often joke that 100 years from now I hope people are saying, ‘Dang, she looks good for her age!’” – Dolly Parton

 

“Just because you live 20 years or 100 years doesn’t make it less meaningful. They’re both short amounts of time. So all we can do is just live in that time, whatever time we’re given.” – Ansel Elgort

 

“If I had more time, I would have written a shorter letter.” - Blaise Pascal1657 (and a few score other later attributions)

 

170603-01

Welcome to the new, improved, faster-to-read, better yet still-free Thoughts from the Frontline. My team and I have been doing a lot of research on what my readers want. The reality is that my newsletter writing has experienced a sort of “mission creep” over the years. Bluntly, the letter is just a lot longer today than it was five or ten years ago. And when I’m out talking to readers and friends, especially those who give me their honest opinions, they tell me it’s just too much. There are some of you who love the length and wish it were even longer, but you are not the majority. Not even close. We all have time constraints, and I wish to honor those. So I am going to cut my letter back to its former size, which was about 50% of the length of more recent letters. (Note: this paragraph is going to open the letter for the next month or so, since not everybody clicks on every letter. Sigh. Surveys showed us it’s not because you don’t love me but because of demands on your time. I want you to understand that I get it.) Now to your letter…

This week I have good news and bad news for you. The good news is that you and your children will probably have much longer lives than you currently imagine. The bad news is that you’ll have to pay the bill for them.



Read more...

Banner

Personal Finance

Invest in Yourself

Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter

Posted by Axel Merk - Merk Investments LLC

on Thursday, 01 June 2017 06:09

2012-07-11-body-armor-gold-upThe other day, I was asked what my investment advice for a 65-year old would be? My reply: “Go to the gym and watch your expenses.” To create wealth and/or preserve it for a future generation, all too often do we lose sight of the big picture. Let me explain.

Most of us invest because we pursue long-term goals, even if the means of achieving them differ greatly. This long-term goal tends to be saving for retirement; for those who can, it might extend to save for a future generation; or, for institutional investors, there might be an infinite investment horizon.

To serve investors, we have a massive industry paid in basis points of assets serviced or commission on products sold. In my humble opinion, our industry is ill equipped to provide advice that falls outside of those parameters. Here are a few of those:

Go to the gym. Seriously. You don’t need to be a wizard able to dissect financial statements to appreciate that your own earnings potential is the one you might have most control over. You have more income options at your disposal if you stay healthy until an old age. While there are limits as to how much we can control our health, it is an aspect of our lives that many of us could easily improve. If you want “diversification” in your portfolio, investing in your own health is something you might want to add to your list. If you manage an endowment, this may not apply, except that sending your board of directors to the gym may not be such a bad idea either.



Read more...

Banner

Personal Finance

What Inflation Means to You: Inside the Consumer Price Index

Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter

Posted by Jill Mislinski - Advisor Perspectives

on Tuesday, 16 May 2017 07:18

Note: The charts in this commentary have been updated to include Friday's Consumer Price Index news release.

Back in 2010, the Fed justified its aggressive monetary policy "to promote a stronger pace of economic recovery and to help ensure that inflation, over time, is at levels consistent with its mandate" (full text). In effect, the Fed has been trying to increase inflation, operating at the macro level. But what does inflation mean at the micro level — specifically to your household?

Let's do some analysis of the Consumer Price Index, the best-known measure of inflation. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) divides all expenditures into eight categories and assigns a relative size to each. The pie chart below illustrates the components of the Consumer Price Index for Urban Consumers, the CPI-U, which we'll refer to hereafter as the CPI.

9eabef2264f0afaf38b053c4e241ae80

....continue reading HERE

....related:

A Long-Term Look at Inflation



Banner

Personal Finance

Is Canada The Next Hot Money Victim?

Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter

Posted by John Rubino - DollarCollapse.com

on Wednesday, 10 May 2017 08:26

One of the interesting things about the Great Recession was how Canada’s financial system sailed through it largely unscathed. Its banks were regulated wisely and behaved prudently, its citizens avoided the extreme stupidity of their credit-addicted neighbors to the south, and its government refrained from doubling its debt every eight years. It certainly looked like Canadians were smarter – or at least more emotionally mature – than we were.

But instead of Americans learning from Canada, Canadians appear to have concluded that we had it right after all. In the decade since the global financial system’s last near-death experience, Canadians have started to behave like turbo-charged Americans. A few recent examples:

Canadians Are Buying A Record Number Of New Cars, With A Record Amount Of Financing

(Better Dwelling) – Sales of new motor vehicles across Canada rose to an all-time record for February. 

Canada-new-car-sales-1

Average Sale Price For New Vehicles Rises
Consumers are purchasing more expensive vehicles too. Over $5 billion was spent on new vehicles for the month, bringing the average to $40,100 – up 3.4% from the same time last year.



Read more...

Banner

<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >> Page 3 of 169

Free Subscription Service - sign up today!

Exclusive content sent directly to your Inbox

  • What Mike's Reading

    His top research pick

  • Numbers You Should Know

    Weekly astonishing statistics

  • Quote of the Week

    Wisdom from the World

  • Top 5 Articles

    Most Popular postings

Learn more...



Michael Campbell Robert Zurrer
Tyler Bollhorn Eric Coffin Jack Crooks Patrick Ceresna
Josef Ozzie Jurock Mark Leibovit Greg Weldon Ryan Irvine