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Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse or the New Dawn

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Posted by Gary Christenson - The Deviant Investor

on Tuesday, 25 November 2014 09:29

fourFrom John Mauldin:

“For a central banker, deflation is one of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse: Death, Famine, Disease, and Deflation. It is helpful to understand that, before a person is allowed to join the staff or board of a central bank, he or she is taken into a back room and given DNA replacement therapy, inserting a gene that is viscerally opposed to deflation.”

Death:        There will be many more deaths – think Middle East, Ukraine, Africa, and the next big war.

Famine:     A shortage of food, whether inspired by drought, politics or war has been normal throughout history.  Today there are food shortages in many countries and there are nearly 50,000,000 people in the U.S. on food stamps (SNAP) – the modern equivalent of “bread lines” and “soup kitchens.”

Disease:    Ebola, AIDS and drug resistant TB, staph infections and more.

Deflation:

...continue reading for advice on how to manage all of today's dangers HERE



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The Lie to End All Lies

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Posted by Andrew C. Hoffman - Miles Franklin

on Monday, 24 November 2014 08:10

On Thursday morning, whilst taping this week’s Audioblog, I discussed how overnight, the PMI Manufacturing reports in China, Japan and essentially all of Europe were not only miserable but well below expectations.  Heck, even the PMI report in the United States of Economic Lies came in at just 54.7, down from 56.2 last month and well below expectations of an increase to 56.5.  In fact, it was the lowest print in ten months, validating with this week’s slew of 4Q GDP estimate downgrades.  Which, by the way, were predicated on myriad factors from weak exports, to declining capital investment and even “Polar Vortex 2.0.”  In other words, a broad mosaic of data suggesting America is succumbing to its terminal debt addiction, amidst global economic weakness not inappropriately compared to the Depression.

Consequently, the 10-year Treasury yield was on the verge of breaching the Fed’s current “line in the sand” at 2.30% yet again, whilst stocks were in danger of actually declining; and, for the third time this week, gold was about to take out $1,200/oz. (after having been turned back by “Cartel Herald” algorithms the prior two days, at exactly 6:00 AM EST).

24-Hour-Spot-Gold-11-20

Consequently, the U.S. government decided to go as “all-in” on economic data manipulation as Japan has with its hyperinflation strategy.  To that end, recall when Forest Gump told the man at the bus stop that he owned the Bubba



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Asset protection

Week's Fascinating Article: The $9 Billion Witness: Meet JPMorgan Chase's Worst Nightmare

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Posted by Matt Taibbi, Rolling Stone

on Saturday, 22 November 2014 09:32

whistleShe tried to stay quiet, she really did. But after eight years of keeping a heavy secret, the day came when Alayne Fleischmann couldn't take it anymore. 

"It was like watching an old lady get mugged on the street," she says. "I thought, 'I can't sit by any longer.'" 

Fleischmann is a tall, thin, quick-witted securities lawyer in her late thirties, with long blond hair, pale-blue eyes and an infectious sense of humor that has survived some very tough times. She's had to struggle to find work despite some striking skills and qualifications, a common symptom of a not-so-common condition called being a whistle-blower.

Fleischmann is the central witness in one of the biggest cases of white-collar crime in American history, possessing secrets that JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon late last year paid $9 billion (not $13 billion as regularly reported – more on that later) to keep the public from hearing.

Back in 2006, as a deal manager at the gigantic bank, Fleischmann first witnessed, then tried to stop, what she describes as "massive criminal securities fraud" in the bank's mortgage operations.

Thanks to a confidentiality agreement, she's kept her mouth shut since then. "My closest family and friends don't know what I've been living with," she says. "Even my brother will only find out for the first time when he sees this interview." 

Six years after the crisis that cratered the global economy, it's not exactly news that the country's biggest banks stole on a grand scale. That's why the more important part of Fleischmann's story is in the pains Chase and the Justice Department took to silence her.

holderShe was blocked at every turn: by asleep-on-the-job regulators like the Securities and Exchange Commission, by a court system that allowed Chase to use its billions to bury her evidence, and, finally, by officials like outgoing Attorney General Eric Holder, the chief architect of the crazily elaborate government policy of surrender, secrecy and cover-up. "Every time I had a chance to talk, something always got in the way," Fleischmann says.

This past year she watched as Holder's Justice Department struck a series of historic settlement deals with Chase, Citigroup and Bank of America. The root bargain in these deals was cash for secrecy. The banks paid big fines, without trials or even judges – only secret negotiations that typically ended with the public shown nothing but vague, quasi-official papers called "statements of facts," which were conveniently devoid of anything like actual facts. 

And now, with Holder about to leave office and his Justice Department reportedly wrapping up its final settlements, the state is effectively putting the finishing touches on what will amount to a sweeping, industrywide effort to bury the facts of a whole generation of Wall Street corruption. "I could be sued into bankruptcy," she says. "I could lose my license to practice law. I could lose everything. But if we don't start speaking up, then this really is all we're going to get: the biggest financial cover-up in history." 

Alayne Fleischmann grew up in Terrace, British Columbia, a snowbound valley town just a brisk 18-hour drive north of Vancouver. She excelled at school from a young age, making her way to Cornell Law School and then to Wall Street. Her decision to go into finance surprised those closest to her, as she had always had more idealistic ambitions. "I helped lead a group that wrote briefs to the Human Rights Chamber for those affected by ethnic cleansing in Bosnia-Herzegovina," she says. "My whole life prior to moving into securities law was human rights work."

 



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Russell - Stock Market Crash, Gold & Eventual Hyperinflation

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Posted by Richard Russell - Dow Theory Letters

on Saturday, 22 November 2014 08:06

shapeimage 22With historic events taking place around the globe, the Godfather of newsletter writers, 90-year old Richard Russell, covered everything from a stock market collapse, to gold, hyperinflation, and massive numbers of homeless people in New York.  The 60-year market veteran also included a fantastic chart to go along with his outstanding commentary.

Russell:  “On the news that Japan is back in recession, the Central Bank of Japan countered the news with a massive explosion in quantitative easing. On this news, Japan’s yen semi-crashed.

The stock market in the US continues with its bullish progression, a sell signal, little downward follow-through, and then either the Dow or the Transports goes to a new high. Today, with 50 minutes to the close, the Dow is well on its way to recording a new record high.”

Russell also included this quick note from Dennis Gartman:

....continue reading HERE



Asset protection

Lasso-like Scribbles Sells for $70 Million

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Posted by MIchael Campbell

on Saturday, 15 November 2014 02:22

Screen Shot 2014-11-15 at 12.55.36 AM

Contemporary art collectors can be summed up in a word right now: Insatiable. Christie’s International in New York made auction history Wednesday when it sold $853 million of contemporary art in about the same time it takes to watch a movie.

The auction house’s total exceeded its $745 million sale in May when Cy Twombly's untitled, lasso-like scribbles atop a blackboard-gray canvas sold for $70 million.

....read more HERE



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