3 Practical Solutions for Investors Over Age 50

Worried about the next financial crisis, but still need to retire securely? We have answers.

Click here to access

Asset protection

Is Cryptocurrency a Government Plot?

Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter

Posted by Martin Armstrong - Armstrong Economics

on Monday, 04 December 2017 06:02

bitcoinQUESTION: You have said that the future will be cryptocurrencies. The Bank of Canada has come out and acknowledged what you have been saying that such private issue challenges the government’s profit structure. Do you think electronic money will be viable sooner or later down the road?


ANSWER: Electronic currency is ALREADY the bulk of the money supply. When you deposit $100 in a bank, it lends out $90 from your deposit and your bank statement still reflects you have $100. However, the person who borrowed the money now has $90 in their account. The government did not “print” money to cover that extra $90, rather they just created “electronic” money.

So what is the big thing about cryptocurrencies? The idea is that it is money that will not depreciate and is strangely not “fiat.” Yet, it is no different than the electronic money created by the bank, which is also outside the strict domain of government.

If you just look at the price of Bitcoin, it demonstrates that this is merely a speculative boom indistinguishable from the Dot.COM Bubble, which also reflected a new era in technology. If Bitcoin was truly an alternative currency that was supposed to retain its value, the mere fact that the rice has soared like any stock proves that it is by no means a “store of wealth” that somehow is better than currency in which it must still be converted to use in the bulk of the economy.

If the power grid failed, everyone would be broke. You could not even buy food. Society would revert immediately back to barter. There are risks to any form of electronic money be it a bank or crypto. The government WILL move toward cryptocurrencies THAT THEY WILL CONTROL, not the private sector. I have stated before, they argue electronic money eliminates cash crime from bank robberies, drugs, prostitution, etc., but it introduces more sophisticated hacking computer crimes.

The crime issue is the excuse, but the real issue remains the hunt for taxes. I have to wonder if the government is not behind this entire cryptocurrency phenomenon. Satoshi Nakamoto is the name assigned to this mysterious unknown person or people who designed Bitcoin and created its original reference implementation. Nobody knows who invented this technology. It is entirely possible that this movement is a false flag created by the government to move society to accept the end of tangible money. It is very strange that the person who invented this technology is unknown and has not stepped forward to demand some royalty.

...also from Martin:

Commodity Prices Before 1259


Asset protection

The Perfect Storm (Of The Coming Market Crisis)

Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter

Posted by Lance Roberts - Real Investment Advice

on Tuesday, 28 November 2017 06:13

It is always refreshing to step away from the keyboard for a few days and hit the “reset button,” which is exactly what I did last week. My wife and I took a quick trip to Mexico to get a little sun on our face while we wiggled our toes in the sand.

I came back astonished.

Over my 30-odd years of working with money in various capacities, I learned to “shut-up and listen.” This is particularly the case when you are in an airport lounge or packed like sardines in a missile-shaped tube hurling through the air at 35,000 feet.

People love to talk…if you let them.

I had a dozen “listening sessions” with a wide variety of people who each told me roughly the same thing summarized as follows:

  1. The market is a “can’t lose” proposition.
  2. So is “Bitcoin” (even though they had no idea what it really is when I asked them.)
  3. The market is only going higher from here because the Fed won’t let it go down.

You get the idea.

And just when I thought I was sure I had the most bullish views wrapped up – Kevin Matras fro Zack’s Research hit my inbox with the following:

“The S&P will double. And not just eventually. But over the next 5 years (or sooner). 

Sounds like a Herculean task on the surface, but it’s really not. In fact, the market only needs to gain on average of 14.9% per year in order to do so. That’s not such a stretch given the market has been averaging 14.9% per year since this bull market began in early 2009, even though GDP (prior to this year) has only been increasing at an anemic 1.48% annual rate. 

My 5-year doubling thesis also means that we won’t see another recession until stocks double again, nor will we see another bear market until stocks double again.

So, there you have it.

No bear market until the market racks up another 2600 points and dwarfs every other economic growth cycle in history.


Meanwhile….Back On Earth

Before I go further, let me clarify one thing.

As a portfolio manager, I am neither bullish nor bearish. I don’t really care which way the market is headed personally. If it is rising, as it is now, I am long equities. When it reverses that trend, I will either be short equities and long bonds and cash.

That’s my job.

My job is also to pay attention to the risks that could quickly remove large chunks of investment capital from my client’s portfolios

The Perfect Storm Cometh

.....continue reading HERE




Asset protection

Taxes, Macro Signals, Seasonality, US Stocks and Gold Miners

Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter

Posted by Gary Tanashian - NFTRH

on Monday, 27 November 2017 07:13

While politicians hammer out the details it is generally accepted that corporations and by extension the investor and asset owner classes are targeted for benefits under the coming Republican tax plan. The logical implication of that beneficial treatment is that barring a market meltdown in the interim, people looking to unload stock positions and take profits would tend to wait until January in hopes of gaining the 2018 tax benefit vs. 2017’s tax code.

Among the under performing sectors subject to tax loss selling in late 2017 I have selected the gold miners for this post because they tend to be counter-cyclical and “in the mirror” to the broad risk ‘on’ asset party currently ongoing. We have noted again and again that with the asset party in full swing the miners’ fundamentals cannot possibly look good, and at face value they don’t. Sector fundamentals like gold/oil and gold/materials ratios are not good and macro fundamentals like gold vs. stock markets, the economy (which is relatively strong) and the yield curve are not at all supportive either… as they currently stand.

In a perfect world stock market-to-gold ratios, long-term interest rates and the yield curve would work together to signal a time of change for the macro. The red shaded areas show a logical limit for stocks vs. gold, the 100 month exponential moving average has limited 30 year yields for decades and the yield curve is on the same message, heading toward but not yet to a logical limit.




Asset protection

Mohamed El-Erian – Which Asset Classes are Most Vulnerable

Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter

Posted by Robert Huebscher

on Thursday, 23 November 2017 05:52

bb437615bd00c8ad81b8ce1bd0ce208aMohamed A. El-Erian is the chief economic advisor for Allianz SE. Before joining Allianz, Dr. El-Erian held positions as chief executive and co-chief investment officer of PIMCO and president and CEO of Harvard Management Company, the entity that manages Harvard’s endowment and related accounts. Dr. El-Erian was also a managing director at Salomon Smith Barney/Citigroup in London and spent 15 years with the International Monetary Fund in Washington, DC. 

Dr. El-Erian has published widely on international economic and finance topics. His 2008 best-seller, When Markets Collide, was named a book of the year by The Economist, and one of the best business books of all time by The Independent (UK). He was one of Foreign Policy’s “Top 100 Global Thinkers” for four years in a row, and is a contributing editor for the Financial Times. His newest book – The Only Game in Town: Central Banks, Instability and Avoiding the Next Collapse – is another New York Timesbest-seller. 

He replied to my questions in an email exchange on November 15.

What is your assessment of the overall health of the U.S. economy? In particular, do you agree with the narrative that the low unemployment rate (4.1%) indicates that we don’t suffer from a lack of aggregate demand?

The US economy is gaining momentum, on a standalone basis and as part of a synchronized pickup in global growth. This process would be turbocharged were Congress able to work with the administration to pass pro-growth measures, including tax reform and infrastructure. And, on the demand side, it would be further aided by an increase in the labor participation rate and higher wage growth in response to the sharp decline in the unemployment rate.

Last month, you wrote that investors must consider whether they are placing implicit bets on three scenarios: endogenous economic and financial healing, long-awaited policy breakthroughs and bigger liquidity waves. I’d like to ask about each of these. You’ve expressed optimism that the U.S. and Europe are on a path to sustained growth. Are you as optimistic about China and Japan?



Asset protection

The Approaching Famine

Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter

Posted by Martin Armstrong - Armstrong Economics

on Wednesday, 22 November 2017 06:19

Famine-CornThe most serious forecast that we see from our computer models has been a rise in agricultural prices caused by Global Cooling – not Global Warming. Crops cannot grow without the sun and water. Historically, when the weather turns cold, the crops fail.

Our database on wheat from 1259 forward (excluding our data on the Roman Empire grain prices), reveals that there is a serious risk of famine from 2020 onward. It appears that we may very well enter a 12-year rally into the year 2032. Our Bifurcation Models are reflecting also a gap in time between 2020 and 2031 suggesting a trend appears to last for that period of time.

The downside of taxation, and particularly inheritance taxes, has driven farmers to sell their land to conglomerates just to pay the inheritance taxes. This has resulted in genetically altering crops to increase yield. While genetically altered crops do not really appear to present a major health concern as many seem to argue, the real danger is the fact that during the past 100 years, 94% of the world’s edible seed varieties have vanished.

....continue reading HERE


...also from Martin:

The Political Crisis in Germany Changes the Game

Merkel faces the worst crisis of her career and many behind the curtain are starting to wonder if she will even survive. The German Federal President Steinmeier could not actually order new elections immediately. The procedure in this regard is quite complicated in Germany. The earliest possible alternative would be to hold new elections come the spring of 2018. It is likely that the AFD is likely to gather even greater support from new elections. Nonetheless, the CDU will continue to support Merkel at least right now. However, the CDU has been severely weakened by the election and if we do not see new elections until the spring, there is a distinct possibility that Merkel’s support even within the CDU could collapse if they see the AfD will win even greater support.

The head of the Federation of German Industries (BDI), Dieter Kempf,  has chastised the political leaders calling on the SPD, FDP and Greens to form a coalition. The price that the SPD will demand is that Merkel leaves before they would consider any compromise. There is just bad blood now between the SPD and CDU. Of course, this makes it even more likely we see and even more difficult Brexit. The practical crisis is the fact that Merkel must attend to domestic issues and will not truly have the time or authority to assume a leadership role in Brussels.

This turmoil in German politics is actually shifting the stage to Macron. The uncertainty in Germany may be opening the door for Macron to reform the EU and the Eurozone pushing Germany to second place. The political fortunes for the EU may be far more uncertain than many suspects.

From a market perspective, political uncertainty in Europe still creates uncertainty in markets rather that confidence.



<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >> Page 6 of 93

Free Subscription Service - sign up today!

Exclusive content sent directly to your Inbox

  • What Mike's Reading

    His top research pick

  • Numbers You Should Know

    Weekly astonishing statistics

  • Quote of the Week

    Wisdom from the World

  • Top 5 Articles

    Most Popular postings

Learn more...

Our Premium Service:
The Inside Edge on Making Money

Latest Update

Opportunities in Uranium

From Patrick Ceresna - I had a chance to talk with Rick Rule of Sprott as part of our Macro Voices series and wanted to highlight a few of the...

- posted by Patrick Ceresna

Michael Campbell Robert Zurrer
Tyler Bollhorn Eric Coffin Jack Crooks Patrick Ceresna
Josef Mark Leibovit Greg Weldon Ryan Irvine